CHERRIES ON TOP

I occasionally contribute to this great print publication, Globetrotter Magazine, an international brand focusing on music, culture, fashion, and travel through an Asian and African diasporic lens. I’m all about it. I’ve written and edited some pieces for them but recently discovered this little Q&A I did with DJ Shred One, Shelia Hernando, co-owner of Cherries Records from a few years back. Other co-owner is of course Meaty Ogre, the prolific Galapagos4 producer during Chicago’s backpack boom (I always dug his stuff with Qwel). Learn more about them and their great music operation HERE.

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KIND OF BLU

I spoke with Blu a few years ago and cannot think of a better platform for it to reemerge on than POW. Glad to have a supportive repository for evergreen material with lots more to come. The original piece ran in Wax Poetics Issue #59 but there were so much interview leftovers I wanted to house it somewhere given his sizable and loyal fanbase. Plus, who doesn’t love his work with producer Exile, Give Me Flowers While I Can Smell Them and Below The Heavens? Blu has solidified a name for himself but is still kind of slept on by the masses, I think.

CHOPPIN’ IT UP WITH BENNY

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If I sat down for dinner with Benny the Butcher, I’d probably ask him the same questions I did in this new interview for Okayplayer. Super conversational, we talked Another Bad Creation’s “Iesha,” his friendship with Raekwon, and his early years in Buffalo, New York. I was late to Griselda but seriously, the only thing better than their recent streak is how quick their rise was (Check out Hitler on Steroids, it’s crammed with back-to-back good tracks).

Brothers Westside Gunn and Conway the Machine recently signed to Shady Records. and hopefully won’t deviate far from what made them great to begin with. More than just a pleasant surprise, Benny’s Tana Talk 3 is one of the year’s best releases– extra nod to Daringer for his consistent production and mastery of the mournful soul loop.

PHYSICALLY, MENTALLY AND EMOTIONALLY / THIS IS HOW IT’S SUPPOSED TO BE – MASTA ACE

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Earlier this year, I had a pretty extensive talk with Masta Ace about his history and was just real honored to hear stories about the Juice Crew, that Biz Markie puppet, and just a ton of stories and insight. More importantly, he’s in good spirits and good health, so thumbs up to that. READ IT HERE.

I was recently in LA and saw this “Born To Roll” poster on the wall of Delicious Pizza. A few weeks back, we spoke with J-Zone and he said something to the effect of, “Masta Ace should be Top 5 alone for how he’s been able to adapt through the years.” There’s certainly some truth to that; just level of difficulty alone, how hard is to do what Ace has done?

SMALL PROFESSOR RECORD RUNDOWN

Been very impressed by Small Pro’s beats and I’m sorta late to his music. Love the name and the nod, dude is out of Philly, and a super nice cat. My type of boom-bap, like this cut for Zilla Rocca. His latest is a big one, as he carries both the production and responsibility of helming a posthumous Sean Price album (called 86 Witness , off Coalmine Records). Here’s a Record Rundown with Jamil for Wax Po, read it HERE.

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I DEED IT: “THE MAKING OF…”

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A new side column for POW, this “Making of…” series consists of little oral histories behind some of the greatest cuts ever. First up is the the single “You Never Knew,” from Hiero off their first group joint, 3rd Eye Vision. Other standouts on here are of course “At The Helm,” or “Oakland Blackouts.” (I’ve always really liked this A-Plus remix of “The Who.” ) “You Never Knew” proved to be a big single off this release, complete with an awesome DIY Hawaiian music video that’s great to look back on. With Del, A-Plus and Tajai– peep HERE. And more to come.

NEW SOUL FOR OLD SOULS

My dude Brandon Roos and I put together a little Q&A for NTTG’s site with members from Durand Jones and the Indications. Some friends turned me on to their first record and the new one, American Love Call (Colemine Records) is a really lovely followup in so many ways, particularly drummer Aaron Frazer’s widening presence. They put on a great live show and are currently touring the new record, catch them if you can.

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THE OFFICIAL WAX POETICS PODCAST #1

I can barely speak without fumbling words. Good thing my playa patna Nate LeBlanc is a complete natural at podcasting– and we were both lucky enough to sit down and speak in-depth with a favorite of ours, Del The Funkee Homosapien. We nerded out and broke down his illustrious sophomore release, No Need For Alarm. Not only does this stand as the deepest dive into the album, but it’s a first in a series of podcasts we’re developing for Wax Poetics and beyond. Take a look and have a listen HERE. And please, no boo-boo heads.

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THE SECRET HISTORY OF DELICIOUS VINYL

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Arguably one of the best logos in the history of logos, Delicious Vinyl’s reign as the longest running, truly truly indie record label commands respect. While I don’t ever bump Young MC, I surely still throw on Bizarre Ride and loved hearing Mike Ross (DV’s co-founder) talk about hearing Pharcyde’s demo for the first time. I spoke with founder Mike Ross and Leslie Cooney, the young A&R who we should all thank for help bringing “Passin’ Me By” to the masses (and more). And let us not forget THIS in 1993.

DV was recently in the public consciousness when co-founder Matt Dike passed away earlier this year. Dike by all accounts was a fascinating person who you cannot deny understood music and how modernity impacts its making– he arranged the making of the Beastie’s Paul’s Boutique by orchestrating sessions with the Dust Brothers, who were early DV adopters and whom Dike named, according to Ross. Their legacy is not only ongoing (this year they’re aggressively exploring Caribbean tunes) but Ross now has two pizza joints in LA, of course called Delicious Pizza– brilliant, and what a dream to marry music and food. Their understanding of music and business savvy is really inspiring. Okayplayer published the piece which you can read HERE.

THE SOUTH HAS SOMETHING TO SAY

Editor’s Note: South Bay activist, longtime struggle rap auteur, and 1/3 of DadBodRapPod, Demone Carter, took a second to explore a fleeting yet impactful moment in hip-hop– the ’95 Source Awards where a babyfaced 3 Stacks unapologetically announced the South’s arrival and subsequent industry takeover. Really glad to add Mr. Carter to our long list of thoughtful contributors and looking forward to seeing what he comes with next. Thanks Demone! – DM

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August 3rd 1995, a dashiki-clad Andre Benjamin glared into the audience gathered at Madison Square Garden for the Source Awards and made a boldly prophetic proclamation.

“The South got something to say” his words drifted into a sea of open hostility. In our world of 24/7 social media antagonism, that statement may not seem like much, but it was a big deal. A culturally redefining big deal.

To understand the weight of Dre’s prophecy, we have to look at what the rap landscape looked like in 1995. Notorious B.I.G was making his ascent as King of New York, a coastal rap war was brewing with Bad Boy and Death Row Records at the center, and a soon to be legendary rap group from Atlanta was taking the hip-hop world by storm on the strength of an absolutely perfect debut album called SouthernPlayalisticCadillacMusic.

Continue reading “THE SOUTH HAS SOMETHING TO SAY”

DJ PREMIER BREAKS DOWN MOMENT OF TRUTH TRACK-BY-TRACK.

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As Moment of Truth turns twenty I realize just how well much it’s aged; “Robbinhood Theory,” “What I’m Here 4,” “Above The Clouds,” so many high points. It’s my favorite Gang Starr album (Hard to Earn, close second) and I had the huge honor of speaking with Preemo and listening to him break down every song from the album with incredible candor and color. You can see how the stories behind the tracks really shaped the album and its overall sunken mood in particular. Check it out on Wax Poetics. Thank you Preemo. Guru RIP.

FOR HYMN, SOULY.

Editor’s Note: Nerdtorious squad and producer of DadBodRapPod, Nate LeBlanc, recently revisited LA rapper/poet Hymnal. In an expansive piece that reaches behind Hymnal’s words for meaning, it simultaneously showcases the remarkably fertile patchwork of personalities and crews during the rap boom of 1990s LA. Concurrently published on our homie’s terrific site, Passion of the Weiss— DM

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Hymnal is an LA-based writer, MC, and vocalist whose work is defined by poetic diction, melodic delivery, and a writing style characterized by inscrutable tangles of phrases that are nevertheless loaded with meaning. With a long but sporadic discography behind him, Hymnal has been involved in some of the most creative projects to emerge from the LA underground and continues to create thoughtful and highly original material. At the same time, he is a bit of a mystery.

Continue reading “FOR HYMN, SOULY.”

#DBRP

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If you’re of a certain age and don’t mind brainy, unsolicited opinions, check out this little side podcast we just started. Featuring longtime Nerdotrious contributor Nate LeBlanc and hometown hero Demone Carter, aka San Jose’s MC Dem One. We discuss old man topics with cool weekly guests renagin from industry insiders and artists (as of this writing, the legendary Prince Paul and venerated MC Myka 9 have been on… with much more to come!) Take a listen to those episodes if you have dishes to do or errands to run– and peep upcoming episodes HERE. #DBRP

PLATURN’S BREAKING THE ICE

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This project with DJ Platurn has literally been 10 years in the making (more if you count his lifetime’s worth of sourcing these records). The project is out at the end of the month on San Jose’s Needle To The Groove Records.

The mix is an astounding collection of obscure Icelandic funk, proto-rap, rock, soul, and disco, all expertly put-in-place by Platurn. The release comes with liner notes (by yours truly) and is limited to 1000 CDs with a booklet of awesome ephemera. To gain a bit more perspective on the BTI, here are some past blog posts which aided in the realization of the project. Peep the nice mini-doc (by Kicker Dixon) above and kindly purchase HERE).

The Late Great Paul C

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I helped edit this very thorough, very detailed piece on the mythical– and perhaps rap’s most underrated, known-yet-unknown producer ever– Paul C. If you’re curious as to why Ultramag’s Critical Beatdown (and a few others of that era) sounded so hard and so advanced, it’s all because of Paul, his deep record collection and forward thinking studio techniques. This piece examines his history and tragic death, exploring more of what eventually became huge hip-hop lore. Written music journalist Gino Sorcinelli. Read it HERE.

DJ SHADOW COVER STORY

I wanted to get this post up since it’s been days since an update: The current issue of Wax Poetics (in print! on newsstands!) features my story on the venerable DJ Shadow. I don’t think I’m over speaking by saying this is the deepest piece ever on Shadow, his history, and catalogue-. It’s not only his origin story but is connected to so many deep, fascinating tangents of other histories; particularly Bay Area DJ culture and Mo Wax’s early days of dominance.

Check out some rad pictures and order it HERE.

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Homecoming King: PB Wolf Q&A

(Editor’s Note: I interviewed Chris Manak (PB Wolf) for a couple local websites before his big show in San Jose a few weeks back. We talk a lot about his early history, specifically his start in San Jose. Take a look Stones Throw fans! – DM) 

HOMECOMING: PB WOLF PLAYS FIRST SAN JOSE SHOW IN DECADES W/ EGYPTIAN LOVER 

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Stones Throw is a defiant panoply of inventive music, a cadre of artists whom flout convention while making some of the most varied, artful projects in recent memory. It’s all due to Chris Manak, who helms the powerhouse label which he founded in San Jose, his hometown and early base of operations.  Continue reading “Homecoming King: PB Wolf Q&A”

THIRD SIGHT: AN ORAL HISTORY OF RAP’S RELUCTANT LONGSHOTS

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Iconoclastic rap group Third Sight has stealthily built a resume over the last two decades as one of the more prolific and consistent backpack-style acts left. They have effectively outlived the two genres with which they were initially associated— Underground Hip-Hop and Turntablism. By staying true to their core aesthetic, they have developed a dedicated fan base that is entirely too small, a committed group of record collectors scattered throughout the group’s home turf of California’s Bay Area, Japan, and Western Europe.

Is this is all that can be expected for a group that refuses to be anything but itself? Their records are defined by dark, minimal beats, virtuosic rapping and scratching, and a macabre sensibility tinged with scatological subject matter. Before embarking on this project, we knew Third Sight was a niche group, but I don’t think any of us realized how underrated and underrepresented they actually were among even hardcore hip-hop heads. They’ve never been signed to a label. None of their lyrics are transcribed on Genius. Their most-played track on Spotify has barely more than 10k plays. (For comparisons’ sake, note that Ka, an artist mining a similar minimal aesthetic, has more than 10 times as many.)

As we approached several seasoned rap bloggers, the type of dudes whose vocation is to champion lesser-known MCs, we soon learned many had never heard of them. Perhaps this is by design yet their records draw consistently high prices on sites like Discogs due to the confluence of extremely high quality music with extremely low number of units pressed.

Perhaps they are best suited to their role as perpetual underdogs, as their output is by definition not for everyone. Let’s begin with the simple fact that the lead MC, a thoughtful and charismatic rhyme animal with a unique flow, has chosen for himself the moniker Jihad, a word fraught with horrible political and ideological connotations. As a switch-up, he will sometimes refer to himself as the equally problematic (though for completely different reasons) Captain Cum Stain. Every Third Sight album features long spoken sections from the pimp-ish character Sir Limpdic. Every release is filled with the kind of dense, dizzying polyrhythms, both vocal and scratched, that are somewhat difficult to comprehend upon first listen.

So, this 10-Piece Oral History is for Third Sight fans worldwide. Enjoy the thoughtful and detailed descriptions of Jihad the Roughneck, DJ D-Styles, and the rest of the folks who’ve had a hand in this unique and engaging career so far. 

THE CAST:

JIHAD – MC

D-STYLES (Invisibl Skratch Piklz) – TURNTABLIST / PRODUCER

DU-FUNK – DJ / PRODUCER

JERRY D “DA HERMIT” (Tone Freq) – SOUND ENGINEER / PRODUCER

ROB SATO – ARTIST / ILLUSTRATOR

 I. PRE-VISION: FROM OUTTA NOWHERE

Let’s start with foundational benchmarks in your history: How did everyone meet? Had you previously already knew of one another? You two met at junior college, correct?

Jihad: I was in another rap group before Third Sight called Un-Cut Poets and we broke up over creative differences around 1990, maybe ‘91. Continue reading “THIRD SIGHT: AN ORAL HISTORY OF RAP’S RELUCTANT LONGSHOTS”

Who Got Da Props???

fullsizerender-27fullsizerender-28Over 2 years in the making, and after tons of orchestration, we’re proud to announce that Black Moon’s Enta Da Stage, a record that arguably changed the landscape of ’90s rap releases that followed, has been given the full reissue treatment. I was asked by Fat Beats to write extensive liner notes for which I am honored and thankful for the killer efforts the entire team did to bring this to fruition. Check it out and pre-order HERE. PROPS!

Medicinal Muzik: Q&A w/ Oh No and Tristate

Our good pal, music journalist Layne Weiss (LA Weekly, Wax Poetics, Mass Appeal) quickly spoke with Oh No and Tristate about their new project. For fans of their fuzzy, disjointed brand of stoner rap, take a look. – DM

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3 Dimensional Prescriptions, the new album from beatsmith Oh No and MC TriState explores the concept that music is medicine. But as with most medicine, as with most drugs, not everyone is going to have the same reaction or experience listening to their brand of medication. For some, the duo’s latest may bring about inspiration, creativity, or joy; others may get angry, sad, a little crazy, or all at once. This isn’t a one-size fits all brand of treatment. It is up to the listener to choose your own adventure.

Produced entirely by Oh No, whos comes from the pedigree of Madlib-esque inventions, the album features collaborations from stalwarts Evidence, Westside Gunn, Planet Asia, Lyric Jones, and others. This project comes courtesy of Bay Area stronghold imprint, Hieroglyphics Emporium, and is out now.

What does the title Three Dimensional Prescriptions mean and represent?

TriState: The title is like Oh and I are both kinda on some techy shit. And you know, he does his thing in the world. Everybody knows that. And I get down with the tech shit too. I work with a corporation called Hunt AR. And we do AR (Augmented Reality) And anyway, you know. I just thought it would be a good way to tie in our relation into tech shit. He does VR (Virtual Reality). I do AR. That’s the Three Dimensional side of it.

So the “prescriptions” are each song. I look at each song like a prescription. Like you need to get your fix for your addiction. Listening to one of these songs might help you. Oh No is known as Dr No so that goes into the prescription thing as well. So the doctor prescribes you medication or prescription drugs for your issues. That’s another way you can look at these prescriptions.

Continue reading “Medicinal Muzik: Q&A w/ Oh No and Tristate”

POW’S BEST RAP SONGS OF 2016

Passion of the Weiss (POW) is currently one of my favorite music blogs and is ran by my dude, prolific journalist Jeff Weiss. I was asked to write about one of the year’s best cuts, “Nas Album Done” by DJ Khaled ft. Nas. Read my review below and check the rest of the thoughtfully compiled year end list HERE .

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[#31] Forget the song’s 8-minute video featuring Khaled in different brightly colored satin shirts—here’s the real major key: Nas’ agelessly nimble tongue and the track’s underpinning “Fu-Gee-La” sample. Here, Nasir sounds like he just finished a Gandhi marathon, successfully tricking his wisdom with the system that imprisoned his son. He’s on fire, backed by bombastic drums and a voice that’s gracefully aged like an Argentinian malbec; textured, smooth yet robust.

In an era where dexterous bars are seldom celebrated, this has enough energy to keep both the millennial and aging classicist happy. Both self-referential and forward moving, says Nas: “To every baby on the album cover existing/This trend I was setting came to fruition.” Seemingly full circle for the MC who at 16 boasted about kidnapping the president’s wife without a plan.

The minimalist production knocks while Nas himself even proves a bit clairvoyant, touching on our now president-elect’s cheap pursuits while shouting out the marginalized: “Celebrity Apprentice a devil show/Big up to Africa, Mexico.” So when exactly will Nas’ album actually be done? He’s recently had fire moments and for whatever reason seems reinvigorated. Dismissing any new hip-hop that came after you is decidedly very non-hip-hop, but there’s nothing wrong in relishing older cats whom are shockingly spry. The song title itself is at worst inaccurate, and at best premature, but it shows why we still owe the prodigious one our due patience. — DAVID MA

Thank You, Sharon Jones

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I was honored to write an appreciation piece on Sharon which you can read HERE. These last couple weeks have been gut wrenching and just when you think it’s letting up, news came that Sharon had passed. To say we’re heartbroken is an understatement. What a gut punch. She was one of the best live performers I ever saw and seemingly just a tough, kind person.

She was kind enough to write a little foreword for our piece on Binky Griptite, years ago, done just as a favor. Thank you so much Sharon.

Galt Macdermot’s Essential Song List

galtI recently connected with legendary composer Galt Macdermot and wrote a short primer on his essential recordings (heads might find the list tepid but this is meant to be broad, quick swath of his jams). In the end, that’s the beauty of Macdermot’s enormously effusive catalogue– there’s so much to celebrate. Take a look / listen to the story, written for Redbull Music Academy (HERE). Thank you so much Galt, huge honor.

Casual’s Fear Itself

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I’ve always thought Fear Itself should be rated higher when in it comes to Bay Area rap classics. ‘93 Til… and Del’s solo works are all celebrated but Fear Itself is somehow never mentioned despite charting well on Billboard, getting significant play, and aging particularly well compared to its counterparts. I decided to document the album track-by-track– with Casual and producer Domino– about the making of Fear Itself for one of my favorite sites, the homie Jeff Weiss’ Passion of The Weiss. READ IT HERE.

NEWS UPDATE!!!

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Not exactly breaking news, but we’ve finally set up an Instagram account! We’re suuuuuper late to the party but we’ll make up for it with a bunch of old man shit we’ve accumulated through the years. Expect lots of music, fandom, ephemera, and exuberance! So far, the response has been terrific. Find us on IG at:  NERDTORIOUS_BLOG

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Also, after years dillydallying I decided to get some stuff made for loyalists. The first of our 45 adapters series is (obviously) Bowie. Others to follow are Nina Simone and Serge Gainsbourg. Hit us at NERDTORIOUS@gmail.com with ‘ADAPTERS’ in the subject and *BOOM* we’ll immeditely ship!

*Also, you can find me on Twitter (@_davidma) and longtime contributor Nate (@natejleblanc). Many thanks!!!

Let Em Know Chuck…

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Photo by Carl Posey

I had the immense honor of speaking again with Chuck D, this time, for The Guardian (which you can read HERE). Conducted right around both the Democratic and Republican national conventions, my main focus was politics in modern America. The published version was shortened and is quite edited, so I’ll be running the full piece on Medium in a few months. Given this heightened, frenzied political climate, Chuck D is the perfect person to speak with. Per usual, he doesn’t disappoint. *fist up

 

Miles Ahead: A Talk With Robert Glasper

The homie Layne Weiss–an emerging journalist whose bylines include LA WeeklyMass Appeal and others– was gracious enough to pen this recent piece on jazz pianist/producer/fusionist, Robert Glasper. Read a bit of Ms. Weiss’ coverage on Glasper and his latest release, a Miles Davis remix project, Everything’s Beautiful. – DM

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By Layne Weiss

When Robert Glasper was asked to remix Miles Davis’ music, he knew it’d be no easy feat. Other artists have remixed the jazz icon’s music in the past, but for him it was different. “I thought I could do it as long as I did it my way,” Glasper reflects. “I felt it was cool as long as I didn’t pattern it after anybody else.”

Everything’s Beautiful, Glasper’s tribute to Miles Davis, features a diverse and eclectic mix of artists– Phonte, Erykah Badu, Stevie Wonder and more whom, according to Glasper, all had a genuine love for Davis. “I didn’t wanna just get random artists just because they’re artists and they can sell albums or anything like that,” he explains. “I really wanted to make this a labor of love because he’s royal to the music world, he’s jazz royalty first. And so I really wanted it to be a real honest project.”

Glasper has spent the majority of his career fusing jazz, hip-hop and r&b together in a way that has made jazz relevant and enjoyable to hip-hop fans. “I’ve made jazz sound like it was made today,” he says. “Every other genre has a representative of today. R&B music right now, they’re not caught up on Aretha Franklin and Marvin Gaye, at all. They’re all about Rihanna and Chris Brown. But the jazz world is caught up on John Coltrane and Miles Davis. They’re not caught up on any new people out there right now. They’re not caught up on us, on me.”

Continue reading “Miles Ahead: A Talk With Robert Glasper”

Bill Curtis: Fatback’s Rise and the Making of Rap’s First Release

“My aim is to be a kingpin with words, kids will jock my personality like King Tim the Third…” – Edan [Beauty and the Beat, 2005 LP]

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I recently spoke with Bill “Fatback” Curtis, longtime leader behind one of the most understated funk groups ever, The Fatback Band. Besides being astoundingly prolific, they’re also known for releasing rap’s first commercially recorded song, 1979’s “King Tim III (Personality Jock)”. My piece with Bill recently ran for The Guardian and I was only allotted roughly 1000 or so words. For those who are into Fatback, below is the extended transcript of our my talk with Bill on their ascent and lasting impact. – DM

Bill’s beginning and love of drums:

“I started in high school, probably sometime around the 10th grade, playing professional. I mostly was playing blues, most cats were only playing blues then. I got the gig because I was the only one in town with a set of drums. But  I didn’t know how to play the drums then. And my mother wouldn’t let no body borrow the drums. And the drummer the group I wanted to play with didn’t have drums. But I wasn’t letting no one borrow my drum set so they’d take me along and I eventually got good and played around town.”

On growing up around jazz greats:

“Bedford, North Carolina. It was like a mecca where all these bands would come through and I’d see them all. Butter Johnson and his band would come through. Duke Ellington would also come by. I saw Louis Jordan and all those acts. But I would only just watch the drummers.”

The making of rap’s first commercially released recording:

“That came about because I made a track and basically we were doing an album and I didn’t hear a single. I told my partner Jerry Thomas that we needed a hit to help the album. Otherwise, ain’t no one was gonna hear the album. So I said, ‘Jerry, what if we do a rap song?’ Jerry said ‘We ain’t got no one in the band who does rap, you crazy?’”

“I kept telling him I would love to make a rap track as our single and one of our members at the time was like, ‘I have a friend that lives in the projects and he’s a rapper.’ So I told him to bring his friend to the studio tomorrow and we’ll make it happen. I asked him what the rapper’s name was and he said ‘Timothy Washington.’”

On Fatback’s artistic pivots:

“From the time that Perception started, every one of our records was different from the last. We didn’t stay in any type of genre and whatever was going on, I was a part of it. So Disco was all big then, so I decided to just do it. Then as the band grew, my sound got more sophisticated, my sound got more polished. Then we played ballads eventually. I always wanted to include songs on the album where people would not recognize was us. I still do that to this day. I still put out 1 album a year since 2001.”

Continue reading “Bill Curtis: Fatback’s Rise and the Making of Rap’s First Release”

The Prince Issue

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I never really wrote about Prince (or for that matter, Bowie) when he recently passed. I mean, what can be said that hasn’t already been? And in any case, words seem inadequate in describing their immense work and influence.

Wax Poetics is however re-releasing a special version of their epic Prince issue containing some serious coverage that any Prince– or music– fan could devour. I covered Blood Orange in the issue whose work is a terrific reminder of Prince’s sonic progeny. Honored to be a part of the issue which you can grab HERE  (before it’s gone forever!).

 

Legacy: Billy Paul

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Everyone’s heard “Me and Mrs. Jones” but I admittedly was never hugely into Billy Paul beyond his biggest hit. His work with TSOP (The Sound Of Philadelphia) is also well known and revered but their releases were always a little too long and lavish for my taste. I was nevertheless pleasantly surprised recently to learn that in many ways Billy preceded Marvin Gaye and Curtis Mayfield in terms of putting out politically aggressive, smoothed-out ’70s soul. After spending an afternoon listening to Billy– and though I’m certainly not an expert–I chose my top 5 tracks for The Guardian which you can read/listen to HERE. You were electric in the smoothest way possible. RIP Billy. 

 

Doris Troy:What’Cha Gonna Do About It?

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I’ve always loved Doris Troy before I even knew her work. As a 12 year old this Pepsi commercial  is seared into my memory (probably like all pre-pubescent dudes at the time.)  “Just One Look” is so iconic and just a perfectly recorded song in so many areas. I slept on this one recently but it certainly has all the right elements that made her other hit such a fine recording. Can’t get enough of this one.

Rolling Stone: Give The Drummer Some!

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Very excited and honored to contribute to this large group piece for Rolling Stone’s list of “100 Greatest Drummers”.  The reaction was great, hearing people debate, praise and talk shit about the list. I wouldn’t have minded a few more funk or African drummers but I get the list’s purpose. Spoiler alert: John Bonham (above) is #1. Take a look at the rest HERE. 

 

Onra’s Favorite Sample Flips (Dilla edition)

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As soon as I heard The Chinoiseries I was hooked. It was very apparent that Onra, a Parisian producer of Vietnamese decent who grew up on ’90s rap, was into beat aesthetics that mirrored my own. His subsequent work was equally as moving and I’m glad that after a few years later, I was able to catch up with him and nerd out on over records. Ahead of Dilla’s bday month, I spoke to Onra for Ego Trip about his favorite Jay Dee flips–peep it HERE.

“Please Say You’ll Love Me”: The Jillettes

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I love how the snare hits so hard while the vocals stay so light and sweet, almost fluttery– it’s both radiant and a bit tepid but it’s a fitting juxtaposition given the tone and subject matter. It’s a Jamaican soul joint (from 1962) that, at the end of the day, I could listen to at least a few times throughout the day. The Jillettes seem to be another one of those rare girl groups where only shreds of info and history exist; send any our way if you’re up on the their brief yet striking stint.

 

 

Midnight Moroder: The Bowie Session

Anyone who knows me knows that Bowie was (and is) a top, all time artist, second only perhaps to Kurosawa. So of course Bowie was fresh on my mind when I recently spoke with disco/electronic pioneer, Giorgio Moroder.

The interview was for an upcoming piece on Moroder’s long history and music and took place only a few days after Bowie’s passing. It was a subject that Moroder gushed about while recalling their time together– specifically when they first met and their late night studio session for the song “Cat People (Putting Out Fire)”off the Cat People soundtrack.

Below is a small excerpt taken from the interview (which will be published in full very soon for Cuepoint). RIP Bowie, hero of heroes. -DM

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“I met David a long time ago when he had his first hit with “Space Oddity”. I met him in Switzerland at a TV show appearance we did together. When he walked into the room I thought ‘here’s this good-looking guy who’s also very interestingly dressed!’ I had a couple bubblegum pop records out at the time and like I said, “Space Oddity” was already out. It remains my favorite song by him.”

We kept a little bit in contact through the years but nothing major. In the mid ’70s he called me and asked if he could use one of my studios to record an upcoming project. The particular studio [Musicland] was in Munich and I told him I was really busy at the time to meet up. Plus, the studio was being used by all kinds of people, Blondie, Elton John, Led Zeppelin, so forth. So I recommended him to use a studio in Berlin I had used quite frequently in the late ’60s. He apparently did and spoke highly of it years later when we met again.”

“We’d met again in Montreux, Switzerland and I remember David walking into the room, tall and handsome like before. At the time I was doing an album, a soundtrack for a film called Cat People. This was the early ‘80s if I remember correctly and we needed the main theme. I decided then that there was only one person who could sing it and that was David.”

“The image of the film was perfect for him to be associated with and I thought the song was good for him; it had this sort of strange arrangement and backwards sounds. And all the added audio, of course, David really liked. We actually recorded it really fast, it was a late night session and only took a little over an hour.”

“The funny thing I recall is that the director of the film was also there working in the studio late. He was overseeing a bunch of stuff that day and watched as we hung out and recorded. It took us only two takes to get everything right. But the director said ‘No, no, we need to do that again!’”

“Directors, I think, are used to taking multiple takes onset, doing everything over and over. But this was the music studio. So David, I remember, was very polite and said ‘If you want another take, okay. But Giorgio and I think it’s absolutely perfect.’ David then stood up and just walked out. I knew David and presumed he went for a smoke or something. But the director didn’t say a single word after that. And that’s what you hear now, a song made in two takes.”

“Many years later when David would come to Los Angeles, we would meet. I miss him dearly.” — Giorgio Moroder

Savagely Good: Tiny Yong

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“Le Sauvage (He Is No Good)” [Rigolo, 1964]

I’ve always been fascinated with diasporas, especially in relation to Asian ones that mirror my own. Tiny Yong was a Cambodian born Vietnamese girl who ended up in France as an actress, subsequently releasing a slew of minor tracks during the 1960s as a side career. There isn’t much info on Ms. Yong’s musical history besides a few conflicting accounts online. She’s an aquarius and is now 71, presumably living in France. Any info would be nice. In the meantime, peep this gorgeous, melodic number.

Triplet Twins

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The Triplet Twins’ “Pretty Please” isn’t lyrically moving (most Soul revolves around love and heartache anyways) but its effusive rhythm and vocal harmonies are really striking. It prompts head nods and maybe even a quick Shazam– and it’s under 2 minutes. Love this one, it leaves you wanting more and I can’t help but think it’s the type of pleasant, sunny, perfectly appropriate song my mom would dig. More quick music posts to come.

Talking Records with Big Boi

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Been so busy I completely forgot to plug a quick piece I did with the one and only, Sir Luscious himself, Big Boi of Outkast. Having listened to Outkast for decades now, it was certainly an honor to chop it up with Big about powerfully impactful records that’ve aided his outlook on music and  life. It’s another one I was happy to do for Ego Trip, which you can read HERE. Some of Big’s choices were replete with insight and surely expected, but Kate Bush? For real? Dig it.

A Complete Oral History of Third Sight

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Upcoming: we’re proud to announce that a bunch of interviews and editing is underway to document the history of Third Sight– one of the South Bay area’s most long running, most dark, most contemplative, most raw, most interesting rap groups to ever come along; weird cuts and scratches of the most left-field samples coupled with monotoned, referential rhymes anchor (their now 15-year old) sound.

We’ll be speaking in-depth with MC Jihad as well as the legendary D-Styles (Invsbl Skratch Piklz) about their releases and overall musical approach. This will hopefully all coincide nicely with their upcoming album “IV”, as well as a welcomed flood of unreleased tracks slated for the new year. Calling all nerds!