Small Records Big Sound

(One of our favorite dudes DJ O-Dub will be dropping by tomorrow at one of our favorite parties, The 45 Sessions— founded by non other than the homie, DJ Platurn. It was an honor to be a past participant in an event where partygoers care about the music as much as the DJs– plus, 45s just sound so damn good and loud! We asked O-Dub to give us a peek into his crates for tomorrow’s not-to-be-missed affair and here’s what he came up with (hit it!). – DM)

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It’s been ages since I’ve spun a “vinyl only” party, let alone “45s only” and truth be told…as great and convenient as the infinite digital crate is, I find far more creative pleasure in working within limits. Sometimes having access to everything makes a challenge banal; it’s like playing a video game in “god” mode. That said, I knew, going into this 45 Sessions set, I was certainly going to bring along a few go-to favorites on one hand as well as some “yeah, I got this” flossalistic singles. But I also want to use this as an opportunity to play out a few 7″s that have always almost made it to the turntables yet, for whatever reason, never quite made my party playlists. To start:

The Springers – (I Want You) Every Night and Day

My friend Hua Hsu put me up on this many years ago and I immediately fell in love with those hard, hammering piano strokes at the beginning. Great vocal touches and harmonies too. It’s not quite as slick – dancing-wise – as other Northern tracks but it has such a distinctive feel and punch to it. Maybe I’ll finally give this one a spin.

Los Amaya – Que Mala Suerte la Mia

I do love me some rumba catalan and Los Amaya’s “Caramelos” has usually been the track I most frequently play out. But this time, I’m planning to play the flip side – “Que Mala Suerte la Mia” – instead. It’s not as obviously “funky” as “Caramelos” but listening to it, I appreciate the slinky soulfulness that infuses the energy of the singing and guitar. I hope the dance floor can get with it too!

Samson and Delilah – Will You Be Ready

Never played this out before but that’s mostly because I only picked it up last fall and haven’t had a gig where it would have made sense to drop it. If ever there was a rhythm that could be described as “irresistible,” this is it. It’s no great songwriting accomplishment, lyrically, but as a groover, I don’t know if I’ve heard anything quite as propulsive in a while.

DJ O-Dub will be spinning at 45 Sessions in Oakland on Friday, January 18.

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O-Dub on Jorge Darden

“Please Don’t Stop The Music” by Jorge Darden is the B-side to a record currently posted on over at Soul-Sides. Head over there to hear and read more; below is the equally nice flip O-Dub graciously sent us:

Darden’s “Please Don’t Stop the Music” is the B-side to an equally good (though more uptempo track “All Alone” ) and the first I heard it, it reminded me of something J.R. Bailey might have recorded if he was fronting a lounge act. There’s something just ever-so-slightly unpolished here but that’s precisely what holds your attention, the subtle “off”-ness of his vocals, the ways in which he’s trying just a little too hard to nail that intimate “breathy” style. Yet, like the song says, once he starts, you don’t want to stop listening. –Oliver Wang

Soul-Sides Guest Post!


I’ve been so mired in projects and deadlines that I forgot to plug my guest spot on Soul-Sides!

I was asked to write about the last record that struck me and decided on Paul Parrish's Forest of My Mind, this folky psych record from ’68 that left my face on the floor. I’m aslo real stoked that O-Dub called us one of his favorite sites. Dude, many thanks!

Here’s “Something of a Love Song”, a track off the album that isn’t included in the guest post. I felt it didn’t stand out as much as the other tracks, but I don’t dig it any less. It’s a real sweet one. Peep the post too. Enjoy!

*Note: The links on the actual post are down from being over a few weeks old, so below are the tracks that I originally wrote about. Peep ’em!

“English Sparrows”

“Tiny Alice”

“I Can’t Help Myself”

Heatrocks For Haiti

If you’re a lover of music and have seen or read about Haiti, please take note of the Heatrocks for Haiti campaign hosted by Soul Strut. All proceeds of this auction will be channeled towards relief for Haiti.

Peep O-Dub’s latest contribution for an idea of what’s available, what’s happening, and how to help. Any way of generating awareness and, obviously money, is helpful right now. Spread the link too:

HEATROCKS FOR HAITI CAMPAIGN

freelance rydah: Interview with o-dub

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Oliver Wang, aka O-Dub, a well-regarded writer (and the mind behind soul-sides.com) took time from his activities to answer questions about his varied output. Aside from freelancing for esteemed publications, Wang also teaches courses at Long Beach State University, curates exceptional music compilations, DJs when called upon and, probably most importantly, is also a daddy. As busy as he may seem, he was kind enough to humor us here at NERDTORIOUS— a site that is admittedly indebted to O-Dub for the precedent he’s set and the advice he’s given.

Below is a short Q&A where O-Dub gives advice to aspiring writers, explains the historical cultural significance of Boogaloo, talks about his Bay Area roots, and responds to other random queries. Thanks for your time, kind sir.

What would you tell aspiring writers who want to get published in music publications, blogs, journals and the like?
Find a new line of work! Abandon ship! Ok, seriously…the advice I’ve always given is that start by asking. People don’t realize how relatively easy it can be to get a foot in the door simply by asking. Obviously, you also have to deliver – meet your deadlines, turn in good copy, be flexible (the last is key, especially when freelancing). What you ideally want to do is show yourself to be – at the very least – competent and dependable. Most editors would kill to have someone be at least one of those things. Be both and you’re golden in most editors’ eyes. The reason: at the end of the day, editors have pages to fill and even if you aren’t the next coming of Lester Bangs or Greil Marcus, if you can meet deadlines and turn in solid copy, that’s someone they can depend on. It’s those relationships that can help you build toward steady work (as well as bigger/better opportunities). Continue reading “freelance rydah: Interview with o-dub”